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Radish Leaf Pesto

Growing radishes are one of the easiest and fastest growing vegetables you can grow in the garden and you can grow them all summer long! Not only do they have a flavorful root but their greens are really tasty too! I just thinned a row of diakon radishes and mind you I absolutely hate thinning! Call me crazy but I feel bad for the little roots that don’t get to grow up to be tasty little radishes.

Last week I used my radish greens to make a tasty pesto! Radish greens have a mild peppery flavor.

So do yourself a favor and try this recipe. You won’t be disappointed!

Radish Leaf Pesto

  • 2 Handfuls of radish greens
  • 2 cloves of fresh garlic
  • 1/4 cup of olive oil
  • 1/3 cup of shredded parmesan cheese
  • dash of salt and pepper

Remember to wash and dry greens. Remove stems and put everything in blender or food processor. Blend until creamy.

I put my pesto over grilled salmon, but this can be used in pasta, over a crostini, rubbed on a rack of lamb or stuffed in a chicken breast.

 

 

 

Happy Gardening and Bon Appetit!

 

 

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Succession Planting

Have you ever planted all of your lettuce all in one batch and now its harvest time and you have so much lettuce you don’t know what to do with it? I know this has happened to many gardeners. The trick is to succession plant.  Succession planting is to follow one crop with another. This is a really great tool to learn so you can maximize your gardens yield and enjoy crops for longer. I have come up with a simple chart that will help you know what intervals you should be planting your crops.

Succession Planting Guide

Arugula- 14 Day intervals

Bok Choi-  10 Day intervals

Beets- 14 Day intervals

Bush Beans- 10 Day intervals

Broccoli- 14 Day intervals

Carrots- 21 Day intervals

Cucumbers- 21 Day intervals

Endive- 14 Day intervals

Head Lettuce- 10 Day intervals

Kohlrabi- 10 Day intervals

Leaf Lettuce- 7 Day intervals

Melons- 21 Days

Mustard Greens- 10 Day intervals

Peas- 10 Day intervals

Radishes- 7 Day intervals

Spinach- 7 Day intervals

Summer Squash- 30 Day intervals

Sweet Corn- 7 Day intervals

Swiss Chard- 21 Day intervals

Turnips- 14 Day intervals

 

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Hardening off you Seedlings

How to Harden off Seedlings

You’ve started your seeds indoors and you’ve awaited their germination and now they are growing into strong independent seedlings! The weather is starting to warm up and your thinking your little babies maybe ready to flee the nest! Now lets not get to hasty, were not just going to dump our seedlings to the garden and tell them to fend for themselves!

We need to harden them off first.

Hardening your plants off sounds a little harsh but this is just the process of getting your little indoor seedlings ready to make the transition to the great outdoors.

All seedlings need to spend a week or so outside before being transplanted into the garden. Even if you didn’t plant your transplants from seed and you bought them from a garden center or nursery I would still use this hardening process. About 7-10 days before planting your seedlings into the garden begin adapting them to outside conditions.

I start slow and gradually build each day. Start by placing your seedlings outside in the afternoon for a few hours in partial shade and are protected from the wind. This should happen for two to three days. As the seedlings get more acclimated to the new climate you can keep adding hours and more direct sunlight to them. By the last two days your seedlings should be spending all day and night outdoors. Remember to look at the weather during this time.

Once your seedlings are hardened off they are ready to be transplanted into the garden!

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Planting Guide

This spring I have had a ton of questions on when to plant seeds indoors? When to transplant them outdoors? What should be planted directly in the ground? There is no exact answer as we all live in different climates and each have our own micro climate. I have come up with a planting guideline that should help you gardeners out. First things first! You need to find out what your last average spring frost date is. You can get this from senior gardeners in your area or you can call your local state extension agent and they will have an answer for you. For example Ellensburg’s average last frost date is about May 1st.

Planting Guideline


BEANS: Sow directly outdoors, Plant 1-2 weeks after average last spring frost. Minimum soil temp of 52 degrees.

BEETS: Sow directly outdoors, Plant 1-2 weeks after average last spring frost. Minimum soil temp of 50 degrees.

BROCCOLI: Seed indoors. Seed indoors 4-6 weeks before you want to plant outdoors. Transplant outdoors 2-3 weeks before average last spring frost. Minimum soil temp 40 degrees.

BRUSSEL SPROUTS: Seed indoors. Start transplants 8-10 weeks before last frost. Set out transplants 2-4 weeks before average last frost.

CABBAGE: Seed indoors. Start transplants 6-8 weeks before average last spring frost. Transplant outside 2-3 weeks before the last expected frost date.

CARROTS: Sow directly outdoors, Plant 3-5 weeks before the last spring frost date. Minimum soil temp 40 degrees.

CAULIFLOWER: Seed indoors. Start transplants 4-5 weeks before the plants are needed to go outdoors. Plant transplants outdoors 2-3 weeks before the average frost date in spring.

CHARD: Sow seeds indoors or outdoors. Plant outside 2-3 weeks before last spring frost date. Continue planting seeds at 10 day intervals to have all summer.

CORN: Sow directly outdoors. Plant seeds 2 weeks after last spring frost date. Minimum soil temp 60 degrees.

CUCUMBERS: Sow indoors. Plant seeds indoors 3-5 weeks before spring frost date. Transplant outside no earlier than 2 weeks after last frost date.

EGGPLANT: Sow indoors. Plant seeds indoors 8-10 weeks before soil warms up to 60 degrees. Transplant outside when soil warms.

KALE: Seed indoors or sow directly outdoors. Extremely frost hardy. Plant as soon as ground thaws.

LETTUCE: Sow directly outdoors or seed indoors. If seeding indoors start seeds 4-6 weeks before last spring frost. Transplant seedlings 2 weeks before and 2 weeks after last spring frost. If sowing directly outdoors seed as soon as your ground can be worked. Light frost is okay.

MUSKMELONS: Sow indoors or directly outdoors. Muskmelons need at least 70 degree soil temperature to germinate. If planting indoors sow about 4-6 weeks before soil warms up. Transplant when all signs of frost are gone.

ONION TRANSPLANTS OR SETS: Sow directly outdoors. Plant as soon as soil can be worked.

PARSNIPS: Sow directly outdoors. Sow as soon as soil is workable. Cold hardy crop.

PEAS: Sow directly outdoors. Seed outdoors 4-6 weeks before last spring frost.

POTATOES: Sow directly outdoors. Seed outdoors when soil temperature has reached 52 degrees. 2-3 weeks after average spring frost.

PUMPKINS: Sow directly outdoors or sow indoors. If you have a short growing season sow indoors 2-4 weeks before last spring frost. Be sure to harden off seedlings before transplanting.

PEPPERS: Sow indoors. Plant 6-8 weeks before the last average spring frost date. Transplant outside when soil has warmed up and all signs of frost are gone, before transplanting outside make sure you harden off your seedlings.

RADISH: Sow directly outdoors. Plant 4-6 weeks before the average last frost date.

SPINACH: Sow directly outdoors. Plant as soon as the soil can be worked. Spinach need 6 weeks of cool weather. Minimum soil germination temperature 35 degrees.

SQUASH AND ZUCCHINI: Sow indoors. Plant 2-4 weeks before last spring frost. Transplant outside 1-3 weeks after spring frost.

STRAWBERRIES: Sow directly outdoors. Plant as soon as the ground can be tilled.

TOMATOES: Sow indoors. Plant 6-8 weeks before the last average spring frost date. Transplant outside when soil has warmed up and all signs of frost are gone, before transplanting outside make sure you harden off your seedlings.

TURNIPS: Sow directly outdoors. Plant as soon as soil is tillable.

WATERMELON: Sow indoors or directly outdoors. Watermelon need at least 70 degree soil temperature to germinate. If planting indoors sow about 4-6 weeks before soil warms up. Transplant when all signs of frost are gone.

Here is a great resource to find your local extension agents information.

http://www.almanac.com/content/cooperative-extension-services

 

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5 Easy Spring Vegetables to Plant Now!

Spring has finally emerged, and we are just dying to get our hands dirty! Even with a little colder temperatures there are some vegetables that are ready to get in the ground now!

Peas

Mouthwatering, tender, fresh sweet peas are a culinary delight and one of the very best reasons for having a garden. Fresh peas have an unparalleled sweetness and are among those vegetables that can never be equaled by supermarket produce. Growing peas are perfect for the beginner gardener, plant them in minutes and in a few weeks they are ready to harvest. Peas are a cool weather crop that can be planted early and harvest heavy yields into early summer.

Spinach

Spinach is one of the healthiest green vegetables you can grow. It’s packed with iron, Vitamin A, Vitamin K, various B-complex vitamins, and a variety of other nutrients, all in a leaf that tastes delicious in sandwiches, salads, and cooked. Spinach loves cool weather, seeds will germinate in soils as cold as 35 degrees. Best planted in early spring or fall before the ground freezes. Spinach usually bolts with onset of hot weather.

Strawberries

Sweet, succulent, melt in your mouth goodness! Homegrown strawberries are a must in your home garden. These sweet berries don’t even compete with store bought strawberries.  Plant strawberry roots in spring, in a place with full sun. These berries are easy to grow, tolerate a wide range of soil types and come back year after year!

Onions

Onions are one of the first vegetables that you can plant in your garden. Onion transplants are quite frost hardy and can withstand 20 degree frosts. They should be planted 4-6 weeks prior to the last expected spring frost. The earlier you get your onion transplants in the ground the bigger onion bulb you will harvest! Plant this tasty allium and enjoy them all year long! Perfect for the garden cook!

 

Lettuce

Lettuce, a cool season vegetable, is one of the easiest to grow and the fastest to mature—an ideal combination! Plant some in the spring for mid-summer harvests, and again mid-summer for fall yields. Lettuce is easy to direct sow, and it can grow in many different variations of sun and shade, or directly in the ground or in a container. This is a great way to have fresh lettuce for months.

So gardeners what are you waiting for?! Get in the garden and start planting!

Happy Spring Y’all!

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Soil Testing

Testing your soil

The first and most important thing you can do for your garden is to start with a soil test. I test my soil with a at home kit every spring. Your soil nutrients can change from year to year. I prefer to just use an at home soil test but you can also get a soil sample and send it to a lab or your local extension agent.

To get an accurate soil test you will need to take 8-12 soil samples with a shovel digging from a range of one inch to twelve inches deep. Making sure each soil sample is in a different area of your garden. Dump these samples into a bucket and mix.  Some helpful tips to remember when taking a soil sample.

  1. Follow the test lab or at home test kit instructions.
  2. Take samples before working the soil.
  3. Use a clean shovel or trowel and wear clean gloves so you do not contaminate the test results.
  4. Soil samples should not be to wet or to dry.
  5. When using the at home soil test use distilled water.
  6. Do not take any soil samples if you have fertilized, wait for about 2 weeks.

The results are in! What do you do with them now?

At home soil tests give the values of your soil nutrients for your pH, nitrogen, potassium, phosphorus, calcium, and magnesium.

Nitrogen:

Low on N: Yellowish and light green foliage, stunted growth.

Sources for N: bonemeal, fish, chicken, and steer manure.

Phosphorus

Low on P: Leaves look dark green or have a reddish purple tint to them.

Sources for P: rock phosphate, fish bone meal, chicken manure

Potassium

Low on K: small fruits, older leave may wilt or look scorched on the tips.

Sources for K: seaweed, greensand, wood ashes

Calcium

Low on Ca: Leaves on the top of the plant are distorted, also causes blossom rot.

Sources for Ca: oyster shells, gypsum, limestone

Magnesium

Low on Mg: Older leaves turn yellow on their edges, yield can be down.

Sources for Mg: Epsom salts, dolomite