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Radish Leaf Pesto

Growing radishes are one of the easiest and fastest growing vegetables you can grow in the garden and you can grow them all summer long! Not only do they have a flavorful root but their greens are really tasty too! I just thinned a row of diakon radishes and mind you I absolutely hate thinning! Call me crazy but I feel bad for the little roots that don’t get to grow up to be tasty little radishes.

Last week I used my radish greens to make a tasty pesto! Radish greens have a mild peppery flavor.

So do yourself a favor and try this recipe. You won’t be disappointed!

Radish Leaf Pesto

  • 2 Handfuls of radish greens
  • 2 cloves of fresh garlic
  • 1/4 cup of olive oil
  • 1/3 cup of shredded parmesan cheese
  • dash of salt and pepper

Remember to wash and dry greens. Remove stems and put everything in blender or food processor. Blend until creamy.

I put my pesto over grilled salmon, but this can be used in pasta, over a crostini, rubbed on a rack of lamb or stuffed in a chicken breast.

 

 

 

Happy Gardening and Bon Appetit!

 

 

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Succession Planting

Have you ever planted all of your lettuce all in one batch and now its harvest time and you have so much lettuce you don’t know what to do with it? I know this has happened to many gardeners. The trick is to succession plant.  Succession planting is to follow one crop with another. This is a really great tool to learn so you can maximize your gardens yield and enjoy crops for longer. I have come up with a simple chart that will help you know what intervals you should be planting your crops.

Succession Planting Guide

Arugula- 14 Day intervals

Bok Choi-  10 Day intervals

Beets- 14 Day intervals

Bush Beans- 10 Day intervals

Broccoli- 14 Day intervals

Carrots- 21 Day intervals

Cucumbers- 21 Day intervals

Endive- 14 Day intervals

Head Lettuce- 10 Day intervals

Kohlrabi- 10 Day intervals

Leaf Lettuce- 7 Day intervals

Melons- 21 Days

Mustard Greens- 10 Day intervals

Peas- 10 Day intervals

Radishes- 7 Day intervals

Spinach- 7 Day intervals

Summer Squash- 30 Day intervals

Sweet Corn- 7 Day intervals

Swiss Chard- 21 Day intervals

Turnips- 14 Day intervals

 

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Swiss Chard Grow Guide

Swiss Chard Growing Guide

Also know as silverbeet, Swiss chard is a member of the beet family for its edible greens, which can be used in salads or even fried. Its tender leaves taste like spinach, and can be harvested continuously throughout the season.

When to Sow: Early Spring, Fall in mild Winter areas.

Sun/ Part Shade: Sun/ Part shade in summer

Seed Spacing: 1 inch

Row Spacing: 18 inches

Planting Depth: 1/2 inch

Days to Germinate: 7-10 days

Days to Maturity: 85 days

Soil and Fertilizing

Plant after the last spring frost. The soil must be well-drained, and enriched with vegetable food. Feed every four weeks for best results.

Watering

Consistent moisture is important to Swiss chard, especially as the plants grow larger. Water every days.

Harvesting

Break or cut the outer leaves off at the base when they’re 6-8 inches wide. Pick and discard old or tough leaves and flower stalks. Avoid damaging the growing point in the center of the plant. If you plan to harvest whole plants, make succession planting through late summer, so you won’t run out.

Special Notes

  • Swiss chard is a mid-summer green that grows well in heat, but will also last through fall’s first frost.
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How to Store Seeds

Seed storage. How long do seeds really last?

There is only few times in the day you can find me outside in the frigid cold. One is, if I have any bottle calves or lambs to feed, and two would be running out to my car to get it started. Yeah I know what you are thinking, what kind of farm girl are you? My husband calls me the fair-weather cowgirl. I just really really hate the bitter cold! So in the winter you can typically find me warm and toasty on the couch with a cup of tea.

When I get tired of reading or binge watching Alaska the Last Frontier, I like to skim through my Irish Eyes Garden Seeds catalog and see what I should grow in my garden this year. Once I make a list of vegetables to grow I gather all my seed jars and see what seed I can use for this year and what I should just throw away.

Containers to store your seeds in….

Plastic bins: These are inexpensive and you can keep them in there originally package with a filing system to organize your seeds by variety.

Shoe Box: This is the same idea has the plastic bins other than they are free! I like free.

Mason jar: I put everything in mason jars…I have plenty, they are reusable and you can usually find them at Goodwill.

Wooden crate: If you’re handy you could build one! This would be a really great gift for the gardener in your life.

Ideal storage conditions…

Seed stores best in a cool dark spot. So consider a cool dark basement, mudroom, or closet. Freezing seeds is not necessary but you can use a refrigerator to keep the seeds in.

Seed Viability

Beans     5+years

Beets      5+years

Broccoli   5+years

Brussels Sprouts

Carrots     3-5years

Cabbage    3-5years

Corn     5+years

Cucumber     5+years

Celery       2 years

Eggplant    2 years

Kale     5+years

Kohlrabi     3-5years

Lettuce/Greens     2-3years

Herbs     3 years

Onions/Leeks    1 year

Muskmelons     5+years

Peas     5+years

Peppers     3-4 years

Parsnips    1 year

Radish     5+years

Spinach     5+years

Summer Squash    3-4years

Swiss Chard     5+years

Winter Squash/Pumpkins    3-5years

Tomatoes     2 years

Watermelon     3-5years