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Summer Seeding for a Fall Harvest

August is one of my favorite months in the summer. Tomatoes and peppers are ripening. Days are warm and daylight lasts till 8pm.  August is the perfect month to start seeds. This gives you a chance to start seeds you want to enjoy well into fall.  I had some spinach and radish go to seed before I was able to enjoy their bounty due to high heat this July.

If you’re lucky and in a warmer climate you could plant some zucchini and be enjoying zucchini bread by Halloween! Some great short season zucchini varieties to try are early summer yellow crookneck and cocozelle summer squash both only take 42 days to maturity!

With the soil warm it is a perfect time to direct sow your Brussel sprouts, cabbage, kale, broccoli and cauliflower. These vegetables are in the brassica family. Which seem to taste better with a little frost on them.

You still have time to get a full crop of lettuce, mustard, spinach, and chard growing in the garden. These are all great crops that you can succession plant all through the summer.  Even with a shorter growing season you can eat these as micro greens since these crops don’t have a ripening period, like an apple or an orange.

Don’t forget your roots crops! Like the brassica family root crops don’t mind a little cold snap towards the end of the season, in fact they taste sweeter with a light frost. So find those leftover seed packets half full with beets, radish, carrots, turnips and parsnips!

It’s too early to plant your garlic and shallots but it’s not too early to get your fall garlic and shallot order in! If you’re looking for a great flavored garlic try Inchelim Red or the Spanish Roja! But hurry these varieties go fast!

More varieties below for fall harvest.

Peas

Greens

Pak Choi

Rutabaga

Kohlrabi

Leeks

Parsley

Cilantro

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Radish Leaf Pesto

Growing radishes are one of the easiest and fastest growing vegetables you can grow in the garden and you can grow them all summer long! Not only do they have a flavorful root but their greens are really tasty too! I just thinned a row of diakon radishes and mind you I absolutely hate thinning! Call me crazy but I feel bad for the little roots that don’t get to grow up to be tasty little radishes.

Last week I used my radish greens to make a tasty pesto! Radish greens have a mild peppery flavor.

So do yourself a favor and try this recipe. You won’t be disappointed!

Radish Leaf Pesto

  • 2 Handfuls of radish greens
  • 2 cloves of fresh garlic
  • 1/4 cup of olive oil
  • 1/3 cup of shredded parmesan cheese
  • dash of salt and pepper

Remember to wash and dry greens. Remove stems and put everything in blender or food processor. Blend until creamy.

I put my pesto over grilled salmon, but this can be used in pasta, over a crostini, rubbed on a rack of lamb or stuffed in a chicken breast.

 

 

 

Happy Gardening and Bon Appetit!

 

 

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Planting Guide

This spring I have had a ton of questions on when to plant seeds indoors? When to transplant them outdoors? What should be planted directly in the ground? There is no exact answer as we all live in different climates and each have our own micro climate. I have come up with a planting guideline that should help you gardeners out. First things first! You need to find out what your last average spring frost date is. You can get this from senior gardeners in your area or you can call your local state extension agent and they will have an answer for you. For example Ellensburg’s average last frost date is about May 1st.

Planting Guideline


BEANS: Sow directly outdoors, Plant 1-2 weeks after average last spring frost. Minimum soil temp of 52 degrees.

BEETS: Sow directly outdoors, Plant 1-2 weeks after average last spring frost. Minimum soil temp of 50 degrees.

BROCCOLI: Seed indoors. Seed indoors 4-6 weeks before you want to plant outdoors. Transplant outdoors 2-3 weeks before average last spring frost. Minimum soil temp 40 degrees.

BRUSSEL SPROUTS: Seed indoors. Start transplants 8-10 weeks before last frost. Set out transplants 2-4 weeks before average last frost.

CABBAGE: Seed indoors. Start transplants 6-8 weeks before average last spring frost. Transplant outside 2-3 weeks before the last expected frost date.

CARROTS: Sow directly outdoors, Plant 3-5 weeks before the last spring frost date. Minimum soil temp 40 degrees.

CAULIFLOWER: Seed indoors. Start transplants 4-5 weeks before the plants are needed to go outdoors. Plant transplants outdoors 2-3 weeks before the average frost date in spring.

CHARD: Sow seeds indoors or outdoors. Plant outside 2-3 weeks before last spring frost date. Continue planting seeds at 10 day intervals to have all summer.

CORN: Sow directly outdoors. Plant seeds 2 weeks after last spring frost date. Minimum soil temp 60 degrees.

CUCUMBERS: Sow indoors. Plant seeds indoors 3-5 weeks before spring frost date. Transplant outside no earlier than 2 weeks after last frost date.

EGGPLANT: Sow indoors. Plant seeds indoors 8-10 weeks before soil warms up to 60 degrees. Transplant outside when soil warms.

KALE: Seed indoors or sow directly outdoors. Extremely frost hardy. Plant as soon as ground thaws.

LETTUCE: Sow directly outdoors or seed indoors. If seeding indoors start seeds 4-6 weeks before last spring frost. Transplant seedlings 2 weeks before and 2 weeks after last spring frost. If sowing directly outdoors seed as soon as your ground can be worked. Light frost is okay.

MUSKMELONS: Sow indoors or directly outdoors. Muskmelons need at least 70 degree soil temperature to germinate. If planting indoors sow about 4-6 weeks before soil warms up. Transplant when all signs of frost are gone.

ONION TRANSPLANTS OR SETS: Sow directly outdoors. Plant as soon as soil can be worked.

PARSNIPS: Sow directly outdoors. Sow as soon as soil is workable. Cold hardy crop.

PEAS: Sow directly outdoors. Seed outdoors 4-6 weeks before last spring frost.

POTATOES: Sow directly outdoors. Seed outdoors when soil temperature has reached 52 degrees. 2-3 weeks after average spring frost.

PUMPKINS: Sow directly outdoors or sow indoors. If you have a short growing season sow indoors 2-4 weeks before last spring frost. Be sure to harden off seedlings before transplanting.

PEPPERS: Sow indoors. Plant 6-8 weeks before the last average spring frost date. Transplant outside when soil has warmed up and all signs of frost are gone, before transplanting outside make sure you harden off your seedlings.

RADISH: Sow directly outdoors. Plant 4-6 weeks before the average last frost date.

SPINACH: Sow directly outdoors. Plant as soon as the soil can be worked. Spinach need 6 weeks of cool weather. Minimum soil germination temperature 35 degrees.

SQUASH AND ZUCCHINI: Sow indoors. Plant 2-4 weeks before last spring frost. Transplant outside 1-3 weeks after spring frost.

STRAWBERRIES: Sow directly outdoors. Plant as soon as the ground can be tilled.

TOMATOES: Sow indoors. Plant 6-8 weeks before the last average spring frost date. Transplant outside when soil has warmed up and all signs of frost are gone, before transplanting outside make sure you harden off your seedlings.

TURNIPS: Sow directly outdoors. Plant as soon as soil is tillable.

WATERMELON: Sow indoors or directly outdoors. Watermelon need at least 70 degree soil temperature to germinate. If planting indoors sow about 4-6 weeks before soil warms up. Transplant when all signs of frost are gone.

Here is a great resource to find your local extension agents information.

http://www.almanac.com/content/cooperative-extension-services

 

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Companion Planting….Friend or Foe?

Y’all are itching to get out in the garden aren’t you?? If your anything like us you till have 6 inches of crusty snow on the ground or it is muddy! Sooooo not going to happen for awhile. A girl can dream right? Well I’ve been dreaming about my garden and where I am going to plant all my lovely vegetables! Did you know that some vegetables love each other and some just darn right can’t stand to be together!  Who knew vegetables and flowers were so picky! Vegetables also like to be planted in different spots every year. Remember to rotate your vegetables and never have them growing in the same spot twice. I’m on a 3 year rotation. So while you are itching to get in the garden lets do some garden planning first! I would hate to have my garden not getting along.

Friend or Foe….

Asparagus

  • Friends: Tomatoes, parsley, basil, & nasturtiums.
  • Foes: Garlic & onions

Bush, Beans

  • Friends: Beets, corn, cabbage, carrot, cauliflower, celery, cucumber, eggplant, leek, parsnips, pea, potato, swiss chard, radish, rosemary, summer savoy, strawberry, & sunflower.
  • Foes: Basil, fennel, kohlrabi, & onion family

Pole, Beans

  • Friends: Corn, carrots, cauliflower, cucumber, eggplant, marigold, pea, potato, swiss chard, summer savoy, strawberry, & rosemary
  • Foes: Onion family, beets, cabbage, fennel, kohlrabi, radish, & sunflower.

Beet

  • Friends: Bush bean, cabbage, corn, leek, lettuce, lima bean, onion, & radish
  • Foes: Pole bean, mustard

Broccoli

  • Friends: Aromatic herbs, beet, bush bean, carrot, celery, cucumber, kale, lettuce, nasturtium, onion family, potato, rosemary, swiss chard, spinach, & tomato.
  • Foes: Pole beans, tomatoes, strawberry

Brussels Sprouts

  • Friends: Bush beans, beet, carrot, celery, cucumber, lettuce, nasturtium, onions, pea, potato, radish, spinach, & tomato
  • Foes: Pole beans, kohlrabi, & strawberry

Cabbage

  • Friends: Aromatic herbs, beet, bush bean, celery, carrot, cucumber, kale, lettuce, nasturtium, onions, potato, spinach, tomato
  • Foes: Pole bean, strawberry

Muskmelon

  • Friends: Beans, corn, peas, radish, & sunflower
  • Foes: Potato, aromatic herbs,

Carrot

  • Friends: Bean, brussel sprout, cabbage, chive, lettuce, leek, onion, pea, pepper, radish, sage, rosemary, & tomato.
  • Foes: Celery, dill, parsnip

Cauliflower

  • Friends: Aromatic herbs, bush bean, beet, carrot, celery, cucumber, dill, kale, lettuce, nasturtium, onion family, potato, spinach, & tomato
  • Foes: Pole bean, strawberry

Celery

  • Friends: Bush bean, cabbage, cauliflower, leek, parsley, pea, & tomato
  • Foes: Carrot, parsnip

Corn

  • Friends: Bush bean, beet, cabbage, cucumber, muskmelon, potato, parsley, pea, pumpkin, squash
  • Foes: Tomato

Cucumber

  • Friends: Bush bean, cabbage, cauliflower, corn, dill, eggplant, lettuce, nasturtium, pea, radish, sunflower, tomato
  • Foes: Potato, & sage

Eggplant

  • Friends: Bush bean, pea, pepper, potato
  • Foes: None

Kale

  • Friends: Bush bean, beet, cabbage, celery, cucumber, lettuce, nasturtium, onion, potato, spinach, & tomato
  • Foes: Pole beans

Kohlrabi

  • Friends: Bush bean, beet, celery, cucumber, lettuce, nasturtium, onion, potato, tomato
  • Foes: Pole beans

Leek

  • Friends: Beet, bush bean, carrot, celery, onion, parsley, tomato
  • Foes: None

Lettuce

  • Friends: Carrot, garlic, onion, parsley, tomato
  • Foes: None

Onions

  • Friends: Beet, cabbage, cauliflower, carrot, kohlrabi, leek, lettuce, parsnip, pepper, strawberry, spinach, tomato, turnip
  • Foes: Asparagus, bean, pea, sage

Parsnip

  • Friends: Bush bean, garlic, onion, pea, pepper, potato, tomato, radish
  • Foes: Carrot, celery

Pea

  • Friends: Bean, carrot, celery, chicory, corn, cucumber, eggplant, potato, radish, spinach, strawberry, pepper, turnip
  • Foes: Onion & gladiolus

Pepper

  • Friends: Carrot, eggplant, onion, parsnip, pea, tomato
  • Foes: Fennel, kohlrabi

Potato

  • Friends: Bush bean, cabbage, cauliflower, corn, eggplant, marigold, parsnip, pea
  • Foes: Cucumber, pumpkin, rutabaga, squash, sunflower, tomato, turnip

Pumpkins

  • Friends: Corn, eggplant, nasturtium, radish
  • Foes: Potato

Radish

  • Friends: Beet, Beans, cabbage, cauliflower, carrot, corn, cucumber, lettuce, melon, nasturtium, parsnip, pea, spinach, squash,  tomato
  • Foes: None

Rutabagas

  • Friends: Onion, pea, nasturtium
  • Foes: Potato

Spinach

  • Friends: Cabbage, cauliflower, celery, lettuce, onion, pea, radish, strawberry
  • Foes: Potato

Squash

  • Friends: Celery, corn, dill, melon, nasturtium, onion, radish
  • Foes: Potato

Strawberry

  • Friends: Bean, borage, lettuce, onion, pea, spinach
  • Foes: Cabbage, cauliflower

Tomato

  • Friends: Asparagus, herbs, bush bean, cabbage, cauliflower, carrot, celery, cucumber, garlic, lettuce, marigold, onion, parsley, pepper
  • Foes: Pole bean, dill, fennel, potato

Turnip

  • Friends: Onion family, pea
  • Foes: Potato

 

So before you start planting your garden this spring ask yourself are they friends? or foes?

 

Happy Gardening!

 

 

 

 

 

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How to Store Seeds

Seed storage. How long do seeds really last?

There is only few times in the day you can find me outside in the frigid cold. One is, if I have any bottle calves or lambs to feed, and two would be running out to my car to get it started. Yeah I know what you are thinking, what kind of farm girl are you? My husband calls me the fair-weather cowgirl. I just really really hate the bitter cold! So in the winter you can typically find me warm and toasty on the couch with a cup of tea.

When I get tired of reading or binge watching Alaska the Last Frontier, I like to skim through my Irish Eyes Garden Seeds catalog and see what I should grow in my garden this year. Once I make a list of vegetables to grow I gather all my seed jars and see what seed I can use for this year and what I should just throw away.

Containers to store your seeds in….

Plastic bins: These are inexpensive and you can keep them in there originally package with a filing system to organize your seeds by variety.

Shoe Box: This is the same idea has the plastic bins other than they are free! I like free.

Mason jar: I put everything in mason jars…I have plenty, they are reusable and you can usually find them at Goodwill.

Wooden crate: If you’re handy you could build one! This would be a really great gift for the gardener in your life.

Ideal storage conditions…

Seed stores best in a cool dark spot. So consider a cool dark basement, mudroom, or closet. Freezing seeds is not necessary but you can use a refrigerator to keep the seeds in.

Seed Viability

Beans     5+years

Beets      5+years

Broccoli   5+years

Brussels Sprouts

Carrots     3-5years

Cabbage    3-5years

Corn     5+years

Cucumber     5+years

Celery       2 years

Eggplant    2 years

Kale     5+years

Kohlrabi     3-5years

Lettuce/Greens     2-3years

Herbs     3 years

Onions/Leeks    1 year

Muskmelons     5+years

Peas     5+years

Peppers     3-4 years

Parsnips    1 year

Radish     5+years

Spinach     5+years

Summer Squash    3-4years

Swiss Chard     5+years

Winter Squash/Pumpkins    3-5years

Tomatoes     2 years

Watermelon     3-5years