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Companion Planting….Friend or Foe?

Y’all are itching to get out in the garden aren’t you?? If your anything like us you till have 6 inches of crusty snow on the ground or it is muddy! Sooooo not going to happen for awhile. A girl can dream right? Well I’ve been dreaming about my garden and where I am going to plant all my lovely vegetables! Did you know that some vegetables love each other and some just darn right can’t stand to be together!  Who knew vegetables and flowers were so picky! Vegetables also like to be planted in different spots every year. Remember to rotate your vegetables and never have them growing in the same spot twice. I’m on a 3 year rotation. So while you are itching to get in the garden lets do some garden planning first! I would hate to have my garden not getting along.

Friend or Foe….

Asparagus

  • Friends: Tomatoes, parsley, basil, & nasturtiums.
  • Foes: Garlic & onions

Bush, Beans

  • Friends: Beets, corn, cabbage, carrot, cauliflower, celery, cucumber, eggplant, leek, parsnips, pea, potato, swiss chard, radish, rosemary, summer savoy, strawberry, & sunflower.
  • Foes: Basil, fennel, kohlrabi, & onion family

Pole, Beans

  • Friends: Corn, carrots, cauliflower, cucumber, eggplant, marigold, pea, potato, swiss chard, summer savoy, strawberry, & rosemary
  • Foes: Onion family, beets, cabbage, fennel, kohlrabi, radish, & sunflower.

Beet

  • Friends: Bush bean, cabbage, corn, leek, lettuce, lima bean, onion, & radish
  • Foes: Pole bean, mustard

Broccoli

  • Friends: Aromatic herbs, beet, bush bean, carrot, celery, cucumber, kale, lettuce, nasturtium, onion family, potato, rosemary, swiss chard, spinach, & tomato.
  • Foes: Pole beans, tomatoes, strawberry

Brussels Sprouts

  • Friends: Bush beans, beet, carrot, celery, cucumber, lettuce, nasturtium, onions, pea, potato, radish, spinach, & tomato
  • Foes: Pole beans, kohlrabi, & strawberry

Cabbage

  • Friends: Aromatic herbs, beet, bush bean, celery, carrot, cucumber, kale, lettuce, nasturtium, onions, potato, spinach, tomato
  • Foes: Pole bean, strawberry

Muskmelon

  • Friends: Beans, corn, peas, radish, & sunflower
  • Foes: Potato, aromatic herbs,

Carrot

  • Friends: Bean, brussel sprout, cabbage, chive, lettuce, leek, onion, pea, pepper, radish, sage, rosemary, & tomato.
  • Foes: Celery, dill, parsnip

Cauliflower

  • Friends: Aromatic herbs, bush bean, beet, carrot, celery, cucumber, dill, kale, lettuce, nasturtium, onion family, potato, spinach, & tomato
  • Foes: Pole bean, strawberry

Celery

  • Friends: Bush bean, cabbage, cauliflower, leek, parsley, pea, & tomato
  • Foes: Carrot, parsnip

Corn

  • Friends: Bush bean, beet, cabbage, cucumber, muskmelon, potato, parsley, pea, pumpkin, squash
  • Foes: Tomato

Cucumber

  • Friends: Bush bean, cabbage, cauliflower, corn, dill, eggplant, lettuce, nasturtium, pea, radish, sunflower, tomato
  • Foes: Potato, & sage

Eggplant

  • Friends: Bush bean, pea, pepper, potato
  • Foes: None

Kale

  • Friends: Bush bean, beet, cabbage, celery, cucumber, lettuce, nasturtium, onion, potato, spinach, & tomato
  • Foes: Pole beans

Kohlrabi

  • Friends: Bush bean, beet, celery, cucumber, lettuce, nasturtium, onion, potato, tomato
  • Foes: Pole beans

Leek

  • Friends: Beet, bush bean, carrot, celery, onion, parsley, tomato
  • Foes: None

Lettuce

  • Friends: Carrot, garlic, onion, parsley, tomato
  • Foes: None

Onions

  • Friends: Beet, cabbage, cauliflower, carrot, kohlrabi, leek, lettuce, parsnip, pepper, strawberry, spinach, tomato, turnip
  • Foes: Asparagus, bean, pea, sage

Parsnip

  • Friends: Bush bean, garlic, onion, pea, pepper, potato, tomato, radish
  • Foes: Carrot, celery

Pea

  • Friends: Bean, carrot, celery, chicory, corn, cucumber, eggplant, potato, radish, spinach, strawberry, pepper, turnip
  • Foes: Onion & gladiolus

Pepper

  • Friends: Carrot, eggplant, onion, parsnip, pea, tomato
  • Foes: Fennel, kohlrabi

Potato

  • Friends: Bush bean, cabbage, cauliflower, corn, eggplant, marigold, parsnip, pea
  • Foes: Cucumber, pumpkin, rutabaga, squash, sunflower, tomato, turnip

Pumpkins

  • Friends: Corn, eggplant, nasturtium, radish
  • Foes: Potato

Radish

  • Friends: Beet, Beans, cabbage, cauliflower, carrot, corn, cucumber, lettuce, melon, nasturtium, parsnip, pea, spinach, squash,  tomato
  • Foes: None

Rutabagas

  • Friends: Onion, pea, nasturtium
  • Foes: Potato

Spinach

  • Friends: Cabbage, cauliflower, celery, lettuce, onion, pea, radish, strawberry
  • Foes: Potato

Squash

  • Friends: Celery, corn, dill, melon, nasturtium, onion, radish
  • Foes: Potato

Strawberry

  • Friends: Bean, borage, lettuce, onion, pea, spinach
  • Foes: Cabbage, cauliflower

Tomato

  • Friends: Asparagus, herbs, bush bean, cabbage, cauliflower, carrot, celery, cucumber, garlic, lettuce, marigold, onion, parsley, pepper
  • Foes: Pole bean, dill, fennel, potato

Turnip

  • Friends: Onion family, pea
  • Foes: Potato

 

So before you start planting your garden this spring ask yourself are they friends? or foes?

 

Happy Gardening!

 

 

 

 

 

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Starting Seeds Indoors

Whether you are from the Northwest, Midwest or East Coast, the time has come to step into your greenhouse. Dust off your cold frame and clean up your seedling trays! Even though you may look outside and there is a blanket of snow on the ground it is not too early to get some seeds started. There are many vegetable seeds to start indoors and transplant later in spring. If you don’t have a greenhouse, that’s okay a warm window will do the trick!  Starting seeds indoors is a fun early garden project with big rewards! Read on to find out how simple and fun starting seeds indoors is.

Seed starting supplies

Fill your containers with pre-moistened seed starting mix. You can use cell-packs, peat pots, plastic pots, clay pots, or recycled newspaper pots. Gently press the mix into them leaving ¼ inch space at the top to allow air circulation.

Using a dibble (pointed stick or pencil), make a hole in the center of the potting mix about ¼ inch deep, place 2-3 seeds and cover with potting mix.

Remember to label each container with the variety name and planting date. Water lightly with a fine spray. Once the seeds are planted, cover the containers with plastic domes or plastic wrap. They will create a miniature greenhouse, which will keep the medium from drying out and a warm environment for your seed to germinate.

Place containers in a warm spot out of direct sunlight and away from drafts.  On top of the refrigerator is ideal, or you can apply bottom heat with an electric heat mat.  Seed germination should occur in about 5-14 days depending on the variety.

Be sure to check your containers every day. When the first green shoots appear, move them into direct sunlight. Remove the plastic covering and water or mist as needed. Turn the plants daily to keep them from bending to the light.

 

Check your Irish Eyes garden planner to help with exact dates to plant certain vegetables. Here is a list of seeds that do best when started indoors.